Kristi E. Mollner, MS, RDN, CCTS-I on Trauma Informed Nutrition

October 20, 2022 00:17:05
Kristi E. Mollner, MS, RDN, CCTS-I on Trauma Informed Nutrition
Rachel on Recovery
Kristi E. Mollner, MS, RDN, CCTS-I on Trauma Informed Nutrition

Oct 20 2022 | 00:17:05

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Rachel Stone

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Kristi E. Mollner, MS, RDN, CCTS works in with Trauma informed Nutruiton.

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Episode Transcript

WEBVTT 1 00:00:00.840 --> 00:00:04.639 Hi, this is Rachel and recover. We're back with a special guest. 2 00:00:05.200 --> 00:00:08.439 Um. She's gonna tell us a little bit about herself. She's a nutritionist. 3 00:00:08.599 --> 00:00:14.000 In her name's Christie. Um tell tells some things about you yourself. 4 00:00:15.359 --> 00:00:20.320 Thanks Rachel, and very nice to be here with you today. Um. 5 00:00:20.559 --> 00:00:26.359 Like I said, I'm Christie and I am a registered dietitian nutritionists and I 6 00:00:26.440 --> 00:00:32.119 practice out of out of Phoenix, Arizona, um in the hot desert, 7 00:00:32.799 --> 00:00:38.479 and I practice. I've been practicing as a dietitian now for about you know, 8 00:00:38.560 --> 00:00:43.240 twelve years, uh and mostly within the field of public health and public 9 00:00:43.240 --> 00:00:49.399 health nutrition as well as work site wellness I've focused on. But I'm currently 10 00:00:49.520 --> 00:00:56.520 practicing out of the local health department here in Phoenix, Arizona, as well 11 00:00:56.560 --> 00:01:03.480 as uh um working on my own private practice. UM. Okay, okay, 12 00:01:04.040 --> 00:01:08.640 um, look at you into nutrition? Yeah, that's a really good 13 00:01:08.719 --> 00:01:12.640 question, Rachel. So what got me into nutrition is more of a personal 14 00:01:12.760 --> 00:01:19.200 journey, and um, it goes back to it goes way back to childhood, 15 00:01:19.239 --> 00:01:23.159 to be honest. But where it started like kind of getting into my 16 00:01:23.239 --> 00:01:26.680 head and like you know, focusing on health and nutrition was in my high 17 00:01:26.680 --> 00:01:32.400 school years because before I started, you know, that this focus, or 18 00:01:32.439 --> 00:01:37.840 before I got into it, I was eating in a way that was not 19 00:01:38.480 --> 00:01:44.319 nourishing to my body or brain. Um. For example, Uh, I 20 00:01:44.799 --> 00:01:48.560 you know, mountain dew was my breakfast and a rice crispy bar was my 21 00:01:48.640 --> 00:01:53.200 breakfast, and I you know, didn't associate the to like, well, 22 00:01:53.239 --> 00:01:57.400 then why am I not feeling good you know later on in the day, 23 00:01:57.480 --> 00:02:00.480 or why do I not have a lot of energy or why you know, 24 00:02:00.959 --> 00:02:04.719 through my moods maybe go up and you know down, or do I feel 25 00:02:05.079 --> 00:02:07.479 you know, angry as they say, which I didn't have a word for 26 00:02:07.520 --> 00:02:12.400 it back then. But nonetheless I got into just reading, you know, 27 00:02:12.439 --> 00:02:15.560 reading, reading, reading, and it was just at that same time where 28 00:02:15.759 --> 00:02:17.759 you know, it was getting really into it that I also was going to 29 00:02:17.919 --> 00:02:23.960 college and I didn't know necessarily what I wanted to major in. So I'm 30 00:02:23.000 --> 00:02:24.879 like, you know, this has become a passion for mine. Let me 31 00:02:25.000 --> 00:02:30.560 take this route and then you know the rest is history. Um, And 32 00:02:30.599 --> 00:02:32.360 it finally led to me to you know, lead me to where I am 33 00:02:32.439 --> 00:02:43.120 today. Okay, Um, what do you do as a registered dietitian with 34 00:02:43.240 --> 00:02:50.039 nutrition As diet dietitian nutritionist. Sure, it is a tongue twister, and 35 00:02:50.080 --> 00:02:54.680 I'm sorry that it's kind of kind of um, I guess tongue twisting if 36 00:02:54.680 --> 00:03:00.719 you will. But what do I do? So? I do a lot 37 00:03:00.759 --> 00:03:05.000 of things, but kind of like just sum it up. My primary focus 38 00:03:05.039 --> 00:03:10.919 is on working with other dietitians and other nutrition nous to support the development and 39 00:03:12.080 --> 00:03:16.680 implementation of trauma and form care within you know, nutrition practices, within nutrition 40 00:03:16.719 --> 00:03:24.680 programs and incorporating them into like larger healthcare organizations like hospitals for example. Have 41 00:03:24.759 --> 00:03:30.439 you've heard of snap h Supplemental Needs and Assistance programs? Yeah? So, 42 00:03:30.680 --> 00:03:32.680 or you know, for our audience formerly known as food Stamp, the food 43 00:03:32.719 --> 00:03:38.840 Stamps program. UM. But I work with snaphead agencies and WIG agencies, 44 00:03:38.319 --> 00:03:46.240 school wellness programs and even like nutrition pantry programs UM again to help, you 45 00:03:46.280 --> 00:03:52.240 know, bring awareness to the role of trauma adversity and how that can impact 46 00:03:52.240 --> 00:03:55.599 health and health outcomes. But again also you know now that we you know, 47 00:03:57.800 --> 00:04:00.080 the people might have that awareness, it's like what do we do you 48 00:04:00.159 --> 00:04:03.039 with it? So I helped facilitate the process and kind of help deliver the 49 00:04:03.120 --> 00:04:10.560 how and how we can start incorporating some of these trauma informed best practices into 50 00:04:10.639 --> 00:04:15.759 again, um, just the field of nutrition. UM. Yeah, and 51 00:04:15.759 --> 00:04:19.959 I'm gonna say sorry. Also along that line to UM, I also do, 52 00:04:20.079 --> 00:04:25.560 like I mentioned earlier, work with worksite wellness programs and with that work 53 00:04:25.600 --> 00:04:30.560 site wellness UM just learning or helping people address like employee like burnout or fatigue 54 00:04:31.279 --> 00:04:39.319 and just uh, you know, fostering resilient organization that can help support people, 55 00:04:39.399 --> 00:04:42.920 you know through tough times, UM, but also through you know, 56 00:04:43.000 --> 00:04:46.920 challenging events that you know, we've been facing as a society as a whole. 57 00:04:46.600 --> 00:04:50.199 H. That's true. It's been a rough time to try to buy 58 00:04:50.240 --> 00:04:58.920 food right now. Absolutely. Gas prices have also gone up exponentially. Stuff 59 00:04:59.040 --> 00:05:00.920 that doesn't know. But yeah, no, you make a really good point. 60 00:05:01.000 --> 00:05:05.000 I was actually just watching the news tonight and or last night, and 61 00:05:06.600 --> 00:05:14.959 they were just highlighting, um, food banks in our area and just how 62 00:05:15.040 --> 00:05:18.680 much the demand has increased to where food banks are now having to purchase their 63 00:05:18.680 --> 00:05:23.360 own food because they're running out of food. So it is, it's it 64 00:05:23.480 --> 00:05:28.759 is definitely challenging times for most of us, and um, you know, 65 00:05:28.839 --> 00:05:34.040 food is definitely part of that UM problem. So well, gas prices are 66 00:05:34.079 --> 00:05:39.920 starting to come down, so hopefully it won't be this big of an issue 67 00:05:40.040 --> 00:05:48.759 for this long. I couldn't agree more. Okay, UM, what got 68 00:05:48.800 --> 00:05:55.560 you working with people with trauma? How did you? Yeah? So that's 69 00:05:55.560 --> 00:05:59.800 another good question. So what got me into it? Um? It was 70 00:05:59.879 --> 00:06:03.519 just I mean by chance, if if I can say that, it's UM. 71 00:06:03.560 --> 00:06:08.319 I started working at the health department again like twelve years ago, and 72 00:06:09.319 --> 00:06:15.160 that's when the idea you heard of aces adverse childhood experiences and like aces, 73 00:06:15.199 --> 00:06:20.720 but also positive childhood experiences. So I started learning about that research and the 74 00:06:20.839 --> 00:06:27.079 role of trauma not only in nutrition but just health in general. Again, 75 00:06:27.360 --> 00:06:30.800 I'm surrounded by so many different professions in the health department, So just hearing 76 00:06:30.839 --> 00:06:36.519 these different perspectives and how these aces, how these positive also experiences can influence 77 00:06:36.560 --> 00:06:43.720 health later on was really impactful to what got me into just diving deeper into 78 00:06:43.800 --> 00:06:46.959 the research as well as making it a you know, a life passion to 79 00:06:47.000 --> 00:06:53.160 be able to help people, um, you know with similar experience you know, 80 00:06:53.480 --> 00:06:58.079 you know, having my own you know, past experiences with diversity and 81 00:06:58.120 --> 00:07:02.600 trauma, so helping others who you know get through what I've experienced, and 82 00:07:03.160 --> 00:07:10.160 um, also working how do I say, a lot of my work too 83 00:07:10.199 --> 00:07:15.240 at the health department, you know, is in communities that are less represented, 84 00:07:15.319 --> 00:07:19.759 is less represented, may have a lack of access to nutritious foods or 85 00:07:19.879 --> 00:07:27.120 health health care needs, might be you know, working communities with higher levels 86 00:07:27.120 --> 00:07:31.639 of violence. So that kind of you know went, uh, kind of 87 00:07:31.680 --> 00:07:35.920 supported what I was reading in the research and reading about aces, but just 88 00:07:35.959 --> 00:07:42.360 witnessing at firsthand and just seeing you know, nutrition and it wasn't always a 89 00:07:42.399 --> 00:07:47.360 priory priority. Health isn't always a priority when you have other situations and stressors 90 00:07:47.399 --> 00:07:51.600 in your life. But also just learning how these these stressors in the community 91 00:07:51.720 --> 00:07:58.399 actually can invoke or uh you know, lead to they can be traumatic experiences 92 00:07:58.480 --> 00:08:01.879 for many people. So, um, it was it was you know what 93 00:08:01.920 --> 00:08:05.680 got me into it was, um, you know, just being surrounded by 94 00:08:07.720 --> 00:08:11.879 these ideas in the health department and then also working in the community and witnessing 95 00:08:11.040 --> 00:08:20.079 some of this stuff firsthand. Okay, UM, what are some adverse and 96 00:08:20.199 --> 00:08:28.680 trauma? Oh, in some ways adversity and trauma impact food and eating behaviors. 97 00:08:28.000 --> 00:08:31.320 Can you tell us a little bit about that. Yeah, So, 98 00:08:31.600 --> 00:08:37.559 adversity and trauma it can lead to um, you know, a variety of 99 00:08:37.639 --> 00:08:46.159 different behaviors, health behaviors, including those that are dietary related. UM adversity 100 00:08:46.279 --> 00:08:50.399 you know it can and trauma can lead to disordered eating patterns for example, 101 00:08:50.559 --> 00:08:56.720 such as you know yo yo dieting, or preoccupation with food or binge eating 102 00:08:56.159 --> 00:09:01.120 or even you know, restricting food. Food is in those cases can be 103 00:09:01.200 --> 00:09:05.600 used as a coping mechanism. UM can be used as as a way to 104 00:09:05.720 --> 00:09:09.399 just soothe self, soothe if you will, and to cope you know with 105 00:09:09.559 --> 00:09:15.159 you know, with struggles and that trauma. UM. Further, you know, 106 00:09:15.240 --> 00:09:16.759 experience like we were just talking about with you know, hunger, food 107 00:09:16.759 --> 00:09:22.720 insecurity. Those experiences can lead to you know, feast or famine mindset later 108 00:09:22.759 --> 00:09:26.480 in life. So the idea that like, when food is available, eating 109 00:09:26.480 --> 00:09:30.080 as much as possible because it's kind of been ingrained in your body and your 110 00:09:30.120 --> 00:09:33.759 brain that you know might not know, you know, not knowing where your 111 00:09:33.840 --> 00:09:37.440 next meal might come from. That might have been a childhood experience that then 112 00:09:37.559 --> 00:09:45.159 is ingrained and within you two that leads to those UM behaviors. UM Also 113 00:09:45.360 --> 00:09:50.480 just trauma can really it inhibits our you know, our bodies and our brains, 114 00:09:50.840 --> 00:09:56.919 but it can take our thinking brain offline, right, so we can 115 00:09:56.960 --> 00:10:01.519 can into this survival mode to where we're not evil to really access the part 116 00:10:01.519 --> 00:10:07.639 of the brain to fully engage in these higher level um cognitive activities that are 117 00:10:07.679 --> 00:10:13.840 required, you know, with so many different uhm um, you know, 118 00:10:15.480 --> 00:10:20.120 behait food behaviors like meal planning, budgeting, food preparation, you know, 119 00:10:20.159 --> 00:10:22.440 planning, etcetera, etcetera. Like when we are under a trauma, when 120 00:10:22.480 --> 00:10:26.639 we're experiencing that adversity, sometimes we can't access that part of our brain that 121 00:10:26.759 --> 00:10:33.320 is needed to really carry out these healthy behaviors. UM. And I'm thinking 122 00:10:33.440 --> 00:10:37.080 also too, you know when it comes to trauma, you know, common 123 00:10:37.080 --> 00:10:41.320 symptom is dissociation. So when we're you know, not really tuning into our 124 00:10:41.360 --> 00:10:48.080 bodies and for years not tuning into our bodies, we may not really fully 125 00:10:48.120 --> 00:10:54.159 recognize hunger cues or you know, fullness cues or even like thirst cues. 126 00:10:54.720 --> 00:10:56.799 So you know, when we're not able to recognize when we're hungry are full, 127 00:10:58.039 --> 00:11:01.799 that can like lead to overeating or under eating for example. Um. 128 00:11:01.879 --> 00:11:07.279 And then of course you know, trauma and you know, aces adversity has 129 00:11:07.320 --> 00:11:11.399 been highly associated you know, with many diet related outcomes later in life, 130 00:11:11.440 --> 00:11:16.000 such as like heart disease, diabetes, uh, you know, kidney disease 131 00:11:16.039 --> 00:11:20.399 for example, which you know traditionally the focus is then just to treat, 132 00:11:22.399 --> 00:11:24.320 you know, providing you know, the right nutrition, right food to help 133 00:11:24.399 --> 00:11:30.440 treat that. Um. But that really ignores some of the you know, 134 00:11:30.559 --> 00:11:35.200 foundational like root causes of some of that those food behaviors to where it really 135 00:11:35.200 --> 00:11:39.399 takes a trauma informed approach to really dig deeper into um, you know, 136 00:11:39.519 --> 00:11:43.360 the wise you know, why we eat the way we do or the foods, 137 00:11:43.360 --> 00:11:50.759 why we eat the foods that we do. Okay, Um, what 138 00:11:52.080 --> 00:11:58.399 is considered a balanced approach to nutrition? Yeah, so I could ask that 139 00:11:58.519 --> 00:12:03.440 a lot, and really it comes down to just eating a variety of you 140 00:12:03.480 --> 00:12:07.360 know, nutrition foods. You know, there's the food you know, fruits, 141 00:12:07.480 --> 00:12:13.759 vegetables, whole grains, you know, protein foods, healthy fats for 142 00:12:13.799 --> 00:12:18.840 example. It's it's enjoying a variety of nutritious foods, but also you know, 143 00:12:18.960 --> 00:12:24.240 eating the foods that you really enjoy. So I don't ever recommend cutting 144 00:12:24.240 --> 00:12:26.080 out any type of food, like, especially if those foods are the ones 145 00:12:26.120 --> 00:12:31.840 that you truly enjoy. Like for me, you know, I like sweets, 146 00:12:31.879 --> 00:12:35.159 so rather than restrict or you know, when you know cut them out, 147 00:12:35.240 --> 00:12:41.840 you know, include those you know in moderation UM. But just I 148 00:12:41.879 --> 00:12:45.600 advise people to not restrict UM, to not necessarily cut out the foods that 149 00:12:45.639 --> 00:12:50.480 they enjoy UM, and just you know, find patterns that can be sustained. 150 00:12:52.120 --> 00:12:56.440 Right, so you know what what a diet that you can then do 151 00:12:56.559 --> 00:13:03.720 for the rest of your life versus just a temporary solution that's not sustainable UM. 152 00:13:03.759 --> 00:13:07.759 And then a big approach with people too, is just learning to recognize 153 00:13:09.879 --> 00:13:18.039 UM and respond to hungers and fullness cues AH and also helping people, you 154 00:13:18.080 --> 00:13:22.639 know, to balance blood sugar. So it's it's key to balance blood sugar 155 00:13:22.720 --> 00:13:28.480 levels, you know, eating a carbohydrate rich food with a protein or fat 156 00:13:28.600 --> 00:13:31.960 rich food because this help can you know, steady blood sugar, which you 157 00:13:31.960 --> 00:13:37.440 know, when our blood sugar drops or it's not steady, it's too high. 158 00:13:37.480 --> 00:13:41.519 This can lead to changes in the mood, changes an energy level, 159 00:13:41.559 --> 00:13:43.799 etcetera. So you know, to sum it up, you know, eat 160 00:13:43.799 --> 00:13:48.639 a variety of foods, don't cut out any foods that you enjoy UM, 161 00:13:48.679 --> 00:13:54.759 you know, learning to recognize hunger and sutidy, and then just focusing on 162 00:13:54.840 --> 00:14:01.679 balancing blood sugar levels. Okay um, would be considered a healthy diet? 163 00:14:03.240 --> 00:14:07.080 I think we pretty much went over this. So what would be considered a 164 00:14:07.120 --> 00:14:13.440 healthy diet? So a healthy dialect would be you know, having balance, 165 00:14:13.799 --> 00:14:18.519 so balancing the right foods. So again, like I said, balancing blood 166 00:14:18.559 --> 00:14:22.639 sugar, eating the right foods to keep your blood sugar steady, but also 167 00:14:22.120 --> 00:14:26.639 um, incorporating the foods that you truly enjoy um, and not restricting any 168 00:14:26.720 --> 00:14:31.399 type of food. Um. But yeah, eating you know, just the 169 00:14:31.480 --> 00:14:39.159 variety of carbo hyda variety of protein, variety of fats. Okay um. 170 00:14:39.279 --> 00:14:43.360 What is the best advice you would give to a trauma victims out there? 171 00:14:46.039 --> 00:14:52.639 The best advice I would recommend would be it would be, you know, 172 00:14:52.720 --> 00:14:58.399 to be patient with ourselves, to be kind with ourselves through this journey of 173 00:14:58.440 --> 00:15:01.679 self care and journey of behavior change. I always say, you know, 174 00:15:01.759 --> 00:15:07.080 it took years for us to develop you know these some unwanted or you know, 175 00:15:07.120 --> 00:15:13.200 potentially unhealthy coping strategies. We can't expect ourselves to just change overnight. 176 00:15:13.039 --> 00:15:18.240 You know, habits aren't aren't changed overnight. So just be patient with yourself 177 00:15:18.799 --> 00:15:22.159 and be patient, um and kind with yourself, you know, through the 178 00:15:22.320 --> 00:15:30.799 entire journey. Okay, um, what should people who are listening to if 179 00:15:30.799 --> 00:15:35.399 they want more and more more one on one help with nutrition? Absolutely, 180 00:15:35.480 --> 00:15:39.639 So I just want to first say I'm not I don't currently do one on 181 00:15:39.639 --> 00:15:43.279 one like type accountsling. However, you know, people can reach out to 182 00:15:43.279 --> 00:15:48.279 me and I can get them in touch with people that do UM. But 183 00:15:48.799 --> 00:15:52.639 the type of support I provide is you know, more kind of organizational programmed 184 00:15:52.960 --> 00:15:58.120 um uh systems level. But I can be reached at my website, which 185 00:15:58.200 --> 00:16:03.720 is habits to heel dot com. So h A B I T s the 186 00:16:03.840 --> 00:16:11.519 number two and then h E A L dot com. Okay, well, 187 00:16:11.720 --> 00:16:18.639 UM, I guess anything else you would like to add? Uh? I 188 00:16:18.679 --> 00:16:25.240 don't UM, I can't think of anything right now, but I do definitely 189 00:16:26.159 --> 00:16:30.720 appreciate you reaching out to me and this opportunity to share a little bit more 190 00:16:30.799 --> 00:16:37.720 about trauma and nutrition and trauma inform nutrition care. Okay, alright, guys, 191 00:16:37.840 --> 00:16:41.480 thanks for listening. Tune in next Thursday at ten am. I always 192 00:16:41.480 --> 00:16:47.080 follow this on your favorite social media platform or on your favorite podcast, And 193 00:16:47.120 --> 00:16:51.120 if you have any questions I want to reach out, always go to Rachel 194 00:16:51.159 --> 00:16:55.159 and recovery dot com, and we've got some new resource pages up so check 195 00:16:55.240 --> 00:17:02.120 those out. No.

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